The Principles of Gestalt Contemporary Lighting

If you’re at Decorex this week, come visit us at stand C29

If you’re at Decorex this week, come visit us at stand C29

We believe that successful lighting design should provide a sense of well-being to both the working and living environment, while enhancing the quality of a space aesthetically. Our debut collection, Aquiline, features six handcrafted designs, including wall lights, table lamps and contemporary chandeliers. The diversity in functional style demonstrated in our designs is key to the principles our company is based on, which brings us to our name -- Gestalt.

 

As mentioned in our previous blog post, the word ‘Gestalt’ refers to the whole that is perceived as more than the sum of its parts. When human beings look at a complex combination of visual elements, we see the whole before we see the individual parts that make up that whole. This idea of seeing the whole before the parts and even more the whole becoming more than the sum of its parts is Gestalt. The principles behind Gestalt are at the root of many designs, in every field from graphics to interiors. There are a variety of gestalt principles, most of which can be explained quite simply and applied to all manner of projects:

 

Figure/Ground | Elements are perceived as either figure (element of focus) or ground (background on which the figure sits).

 

Area | The smaller of two overlapping objects is seen as figure. The larger is seen as ground.

 

Similarity | Things that are similar are perceived to be more related than things that are dissimilar.

 

Isomorphism | Similarity that can be behavioral or perceptual and can be response based on viewer’s previous experience. Think non-visual similarity.

 

Uniform Connectedness | Elements that have a visual connectedness are perceived as being more related than elements with no connection.

 

Continuation | Elements arranged on a line or curve are perceived to be more related than elements not on the line or curve.

 

Closure | When looking at a complex arrangement of individual elements, we tend to look for a single, recognisable pattern.

 

Proximity | Things that are close to one another are perceived to be more related than things that are spaced farther apart.

 

Common Fate | Elements moving in the same direction are perceived as being more related than elements that are stationary or that move in different directions. Elements that change at the same time group together.

 

Symmetry | The idea that when we perceive objects we tend to perceive them as symmetrical shapes that form around their centre.

 

Parallelism | Elements that are parallel to each other appear more related than elements not parallel to each other.

 

Common Region | Elements tend to be grouped together if they are located within the same closed region.

 

Past Experience | Elements tend to be grouped together if in the past experience of the observer they were often grouped together.

 

Law of Focal Point | A point of interest, emphasis, or difference will capture and hold the viewer’s attention.

 

Law of Prägnanz | People will perceive and interpret ambiguous or complex images as the simplest form possible.

 

Read more about Gestalt principle and its design influence over on Smashing Magazine.


Gestalt’s Creative Director Christopher Jenner will be discussing the power of lighting in interior design alongside Chris Miller and Paul Nulty at Decorex, 2pm, 19 September 2018.

 

Christopher Jenner